Author Topic: War over Braunstone  (Read 12586 times)

jobee

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War over Braunstone
« on: 10:15:45, 11/01/07 »
War over Braunstone

Walking round or sitting down,
I often get my mind around,
Things that happened long ago,
Up to my waist in drifting snow.

Or when I wondered how and why,
Birds took wing and learned to fly,
When women often talked of war,
And boyfriends they would see no more.

Airplanes that filled the sky,
Where they going? for what and why?
Vapour trails all day long,
Today you know there's something on.

And then at night what a show,
Amazing searchlights all aglow,
They pierce the sky off, then on,
Till droning planes they shine upon.

Little silver specks on high,
Like luminescent fire fly,
Huddled together in groups of four,
Embroiled into the winds of war.

I hope that there's some more to come,
O boy! am I just having fun,
Id love to see a plane on fire,
Crash into that old church spire.

And parachutes come floating down,
And me the hero of the town,
Arrest them all and take them to,
That old home guard arresting crew.

Alas, the all clear can be heard,
Then at once my thoughts transferred,
Tomorrows school what a shame!
Not those silly sums again.

I much prefer Bluebell Wood,
Pretending I am Robin Hood,
Or Fir Tree Forest that secret place,
Where startled pheasants scurry apace.

I'm tiring now must close my eyes,
Lets hope tomorrow brings surprise,
With some good luck the schools ablaze.
And I'll indulge in halcyon days.

Jb a coy 3 paraŠ

jobee

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Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #1 on: 07:57:37, 16/02/07 »
About 1943

m1pete

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Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #2 on: 21:13:02, 01/08/07 »
JB do you remember what streets were bombed in the war in Braunstone, some people say court crescent was near to the old clinic, some say Willinger Way and Cowdall Road, can you enlighten me please.

PS  did the park get hit as well, I think that I can remember a big Crater on their in the 1960's

jobee

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Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #3 on: 20:54:28, 08/08/07 »
Cort Cresent was bombed and so was Wellinger way--- I believe there were five or six
deaths in Wellinger and none in Cort Cresent---Cowdall rd was not Bombed-- I lived in Cowdall No 22.

jobee

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Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #4 on: 21:15:03, 08/08/07 »
I Dont remember the park being bombed---the US paratroops were stationed there under the youngest General in the US  army.
General Gavin--[DECEASED]

m1pete

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Re: War with Braunstone/Newparks
« Reply #5 on: 21:19:39, 07/02/08 »
Do you remember when it was not safe for a young person to cross the line that was the border with Newparks and Braunstone back in the 60's 70's, thats wear the real war was for us lads then.
Not in Europe.



m1pete. 

jobee

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Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #6 on: 19:15:49, 15/02/08 »
Ithink it was the railway line, i m not sure because i lived and worked in coventry in those years.


Clive Cartwright

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Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #7 on: 08:24:45, 02/11/10 »
As far as we're aware, there were 4 bombs that fell on Braunstone, on the 17th May 1941. Two of these were UXBs and they landed on the park. It is quite possible the craters may have been the pits where these were dug out and removed...?
 
It's likely that these bombs were jettisoned on a return mission from a missed target, but I wouldn't be suprised if they were aiming for the searchlight battery on Western Park.
 
The US 82nd Airborne Division HQ arrived on the park in 1944. These guys were already well hardened paratroopers (and glider infantry) by the time they pitched up on the park, and were regrouping/preparing for both D-Day, and operation Market-Garden of 'A Bridge Too Far' fame.

jazzaroo

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Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #8 on: 18:05:27, 10/01/11 »
who the hell would start a war over braunston!!  i was a saffie, much more sophisticated.

Clive Cartwright

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Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #9 on: 10:04:04, 11/01/11 »
Just so happens that the Saff had a close call, too. Incendiary bombs were recorded falling adjacent to the railway line and all along Burnside Road, Meadow Gardens and Babingdon Row. Saffron Hill Cemetery and the fields behind received two oil bombs and three high explosive bombs on the night of July 9th 1941, in a line from Saffron Road to just short of the Aylestone Lane/railway bridge.

jazzaroo

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Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #10 on: 17:06:05, 11/01/11 »
Hi Clive, thats interesting as i lived at meadow gardens ,I was born there in 1940 and can remember back to when i was about three but i never heard of the close call ,my sister Shirley who is on the forum under her real name might remember as she is five years older than me,  cheers

jazzaroo

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Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #11 on: 01:56:29, 12/01/11 »
Hi Clive, just to follow up my last message, my sister does remember the near misses that you described,she also remembers parts of cavendish road that were destroyed about the same time, she reckons that they were probably aiming for the cooling towers ,the gasworks and of course the railway lines, she also remembers that the cooling towers in raw dykes road were camaflouged to look like trees, anyway its interesteing that she remembers all this, if they were aiming for those targets the gerries were pretty crap bomb aimers, perhaps they should have took some advice from our bomber harris who seemed to get it right.

Johned

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Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #12 on: 20:00:18, 12/01/11 »
From what I have read, the Germans were supposed to have been very accurate in their bomb aiming.  Their aircraft, evidently flew along a radio beam called the Lorenz system which was broadcast from two continental radio stations and when the beams coincided, a change of sound pitch in his earphones warned the pilot they were over the target and he released the bombs.  They could adjust the range of the beams accordingly which was why they were able to bomb far afield cities from the continent such as Belfast, Glasgow and Liverpool.
I gather the RAF were not, even with the sophisticated systems developed later, particularly accurate which is why they switched from bombing targets of tactical importance to area bombing which was intended to cause the wearing down of civilian morale. On a lighter note, a badly damaged enemy bomber crashed near Oakham and one of the survivors walked into the town to surrender and get help for his injured comrades.  It says much for the simpleness of people then in that one of the locals he encountered said "Crickey mate, you're up early!"
The fact he was wearing an alien uniform obviously did'nt occur to the chap. The German had to hang around until a policeman could be found.  I read this in a copy of "The rutland Magazine", I think it was, many years ago.

jazzaroo

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Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #13 on: 20:23:00, 12/01/11 »
well done Johned ,you have obviously done you homework on that subject and it makes for interesting reading in which case my apologies to the luftwaffe as i had no idea that they were so sophisticated, according to contibutors both Clive and Shirley the events that we are talking about happened in 1941 which of course i have no memory of that, but would assume it was pre radar as I'm not sure when radar came into it ,perhaps you could enlighten me as i would be interested to know.  thank god the germans didn't bomb our chip shop, how would we have survived ?

Johned

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Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #14 on: 18:55:43, 13/01/11 »
All this talk about bombing, it must have been utterly terrifying to have been on the receiving end in Braunstone or elsewhere.  Whilst doing National Service at Glen Parva barracks, I recall a local Leicester old soldier telling me that he was stationed there on the Sunday war was declared.  The next day his little lot lorried out for a secret destination which turned out to be Hunt's Brewery in Stamford thirty miles away and what proved to be the best posting he ever had for a few weeks until they embarked for France and was introduced to the real war. He told me he firstly could never fathom the intelligence of the higher command who thought it wise to station soldiers in a working brewery and secondly was Hunt's brewery on the list of Hitler's prime targets?  Evidently the women workers used to constantly pass bottles of their brew to the soldiery. It's just conceivable that Adolph thought the greatest blow to English morale would be disruption of the beer supplies!

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