Author Topic: War over Braunstone  (Read 12651 times)

Johned

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 80
Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #15 on: 19:09:30, 13/01/11 »
Jazaroo I'm not too clued up on the technicalities of radar.  I worked for the RAF for a time and was involved in the paperwork thereto and keeping track of the number of mobile units on the unit charge.  The boffins more intricately attached to the art, walked about muttering about such things as wave guide, oscillations and other alien phrases which, although explained to me more than once, remain pretty much unfathomable despite my unconvincing nodding as if I understood!  I recall one windy winter afternoon walking around the station as the number of units on paper did'nt tie up with reality and I had to do a "head count".  There was not much chance one could stray as it weighed in at about 25 tonnes!  No doubt, it was and still is, all very interesting.  An old friend of mine was called into the RAF for National Service in 1948 when it was eighteen months duration and he was selected for training as a radar technician.  The course at Locking in Somerset lasted just about all his eighteen months so he told me.

Johned

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 80
Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #16 on: 19:21:32, 13/01/11 »
Hope I'm not hogging too much space, I've posted three messages in a row!  However, Jazaroo commented on the bombing of his local chip shop and what a crisis this would have been.  I then remembered getting a thick ear toward the end of the war through displaying what I thought was great initiative!  Saturday lunchtimes my job was to queue at our local for fish and chips four times; self, mum, aunt and uncle.  You had to be early before the fish ran out.  Sure enough, the client before me took the last of the fish and I was faced with a dilemma, what to do?  Thinking on the hoof so to speak, I thought Spam, chips and peas and boldly asked for "Two shillings worth of chips please" knowing we had a tin of Spam at home.  Staggering under the weight of a very large parcel which two shillingsworth of chips comprised in those days, I was soon disabused of any initiative I thought I had displayed.  The inevitable clip around the ear and we certainly filled up on chips!

shirley

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 25
Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #17 on: 22:39:59, 13/01/11 »
 :) Whats with this inevitable clip round the ear.     Was it something commonly used as i never came across it before. It don'nt sound very g
ood to have tho.  Did many of you out there get it?
 
Never heard of it!!!!     By the way i tell lies too.

jazzaroo

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 127
Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #18 on: 23:07:51, 13/01/11 »
Spike milligan said in one of his books that luck and stupidy won the war and I think that he was probably right.

Dennis Neal

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 64
Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #19 on: 11:55:53, 14/01/11 »
Give that man a clip round the ear!!!!!!!!
Dennis

jazzaroo

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 127
Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #20 on: 12:41:56, 14/01/11 »
just to explain to the uninitiated that a clip round the ear could be quite painful easpecially in the cold weather, it seemed to be a favourite pastime of schoolteachers who woudd dish this out in the playground, best way to combat that was to wear the dreaded home knitted baraclava, i'm not sure what was worse the clip round the ear or the itchy rash from the wool

Clive Cartwright

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 21
Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #21 on: 10:53:34, 21/01/11 »
...she reckons that they were probably aiming for the cooling towers, the gasworks and of course the railway lines,... if they were aiming for those targets the gerries were pretty crap bomb aimers, perhaps they should have took some advice from our bomber harris who seemed to get it right.

Hi Jazzaroo,
It's more likely that they were aiming for the South Wigston marshalling yard, or even the Glen Parva Barracks. The first large HE that hit the house at the southern end of Saffron Road, almost hit it's mark in that case.


Clive Cartwright

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 21
Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #22 on: 11:04:00, 21/01/11 »
Jazaroo I'm not too clued up on the technicalities of radar.  I worked for the RAF for a time and was involved in the paperwork thereto and keeping track of the number of mobile units on the unit charge.  The boffins more intricately attached to the art, walked about muttering about such things as wave guide, oscillations and other alien phrases which, although explained to me more than once, remain pretty much unfathomable despite my unconvincing nodding as if I understood!  I recall one windy winter afternoon walking around the station as the number of units on paper did'nt tie up with reality and I had to do a "head count".  There was not much chance one could stray as it weighed in at about 25 tonnes!  No doubt, it was and still is, all very interesting.  An old friend of mine was called into the RAF for National Service in 1948 when it was eighteen months duration and he was selected for training as a radar technician.  The course at Locking in Somerset lasted just about all his eighteen months so he told me.

Just about to embark on reading this monster. If the others in this series is anything to go on, this should have all the answers, on the British Radar.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0413772292/wartimeleicester
 
 

Alan

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 61
Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #23 on: 20:24:14, 19/03/11 »
I have a memory of a crashed plane on what is the school fields on the left just before you get to South Wigston nearly facing Sturdee Road is it.   Was it a dream or did one crash there?  Any ideas?

Alan

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 61
Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #24 on: 20:25:19, 19/03/11 »
I have a memory of a crashed plane on what is the school fields on the left just before you get to South Wigston nearly facing Sturdee Road is it.   Was it a dream or did one crash there?  Any ideas?

Alan

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 61
Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #25 on: 20:26:30, 19/03/11 »
I have a memory of a crashed plane on what is the school fields on the left just before you get to South Wigston nearly facing Sturdee Road is it.   Was it a dream or did one crash there?  Any ideas?

Alan

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 61
Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #26 on: 20:26:48, 19/03/11 »
Sorry.

Clive Cartwright

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 21
Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #27 on: 09:58:06, 20/03/11 »

I have a memory of a crashed plane on what is the school fields on the left just before you get to South Wigston nearly facing Sturdee Road is it.   Was it a dream or did one crash there?  Any ideas?

Sorry Alan, there's no records that show any aircraft crash in this area, at all. In fact, the nearest bomb was east of Saffron Road, roughly opposite Namur Road. There's a book published on it, in fact. It's a good read:


The Pantry Under the Stairs: Childhood Memories of World War II
by Valerie Tedder
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0952109018/wartimeleicester

Alan

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 61
Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #28 on: 12:52:28, 05/04/11 »
There are massive shelters under Braunstone Park.  I think they were for the yanks. Years back a tree fell revealing them.  I went down with the kids quite large the air equipment is still down there./  8)

Clive Cartwright

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 21
Re: War over Braunstone
« Reply #29 on: 13:26:50, 05/04/11 »
I wonder if anyone photographed these...?
 
I'd love to know what does remain there.

To reply please join us (it's free) and help create a useful online community for the people of Leicester.  Already a member? Login here.