Author Topic: Things you dont see anymore  (Read 21566 times)

Rodders

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #15 on: 15:24:10, 16/12/10 »

My first school, Charwood Street is still there but renamed. Charnwood Street was full of shops when I lived there but it has completely disappeared.


Ha, Charnwood street, (Charnie) that brings back memories, I worked in a butchers shop there for a while as relief staff member, If I remember correctly the manager was known as 'tubby' (or something similar) It had not long been taken over by the Dewhirst chain.
Three other shops I recall on the street was the shop next door which sold horse meat that was dyed purple so it couldn't be sold for human consumption, Worthingtons, and of course 'Paddys Swag shop'.  If you ever wanted anything, you could always find it on Charnie eh.

Rod.

Dennis Neal

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #16 on: 19:05:20, 16/12/10 »
I am thinking in the 1930's now when there was a shop on every corner and the barbers clippers worked by a leather strop on a tapered spindle to vary the speed.
When women shopped every day using a shopping basket and the grocer cut off a chunk of butter and patted it into shape before wrapping. Bacon was sliced to your desired thickness, to order.
When the Offie was just around the corner and was kept busy filling the jugs with Mild and Bitter.
When wine was something for the rich.
When a chicken was the sort of luxury reserved for Christmas and perhaps Easter. Every scrap of food had to be eaten on the day because there was no refrigeration.
When even the mention of curry would have made everyone say "Foreign Muck".
I lived in Hart Road and poor as we were, there was always food on the table even though the money had probably come to an end before the next payday.
My Mother was a wonderful manager.
 
Dennis

Johned

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #17 on: 19:33:53, 16/12/10 »
Sorry to read of your sight problems Dennis.  It's a nice place Wimborne; we like to holiday in Bournemouth and invariably patronize the well known Wimborne market on the Sunday.  There is also a jolly good fish and chip shop there but I don't recall the name - a very smart place with dark wood interior panelling.

Dennis Neal

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #18 on: 13:06:21, 17/12/10 »
Coincidence! I have just come back from our usual friday trip to Wimborne market, about 2.5 miles walk from where I live. We buy eggs and veg from the farmers market,
come home on the bus - can't manage the steep hills anymore.
The Chippy is close to the market. Used to be called Longs, now called Long John's.
It was a beautiful morning when we walked down but was snowing when we returned and is now very heavy.
Snow and ice are the only things to keep me indoors as I am very scared of falling.
Plenty of food and milk in the fridge, so we can survive whatever is to come. 
Dennis

jazzaroo

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #19 on: 18:00:38, 10/01/11 »
I can remember the horse drawn bakers and coal carriages, one horse used to always pee  outside our house and used to fill the gutter in no time,i bet that theres a few old guys on here that would love to be able to do that  now.
anyone remember the whip and top craze that used to appear annually in the wintertime along with winter warmers that was usually a  tin with holes containing a fire, it was attached to a wire and the holder would swing it around to make patterns,the only pattern that i could make was the butterfly which was easy.

Dennis Neal

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #20 on: 18:35:50, 10/01/11 »
I can remember the horse drawn milk cart where the milk was ladled from a churn into the customers own jug.
One day the horse slipped on the cobbled road and fell. I had to sit on its head whilst the harness was unfastened. When the horse staggered to its feet it bit me on the shoulder for my trouble.
We used to play whip and top every year. Games were seasonal then.
Dennis

Dennis Neal

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #21 on: 18:50:30, 10/01/11 »
The Nightwatchman?
Whenever there was a hole in the road for a water or gas leak, these things took several days to repair and a nightwatchman would sit in a little canvas shelter warmed only by a coke brazier. His kettle was always steaming and he had a metal plate where he cooked his supper.
Dennis


jazzaroo

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #22 on: 20:36:49, 10/01/11 »
Hi dennis,yep ,i do remember the old night watchman and their coke braziers, sounds like your experience with horses is akin to mine,i bought my daughters a horse years ago  first it head butted me then it tried  to manourve me to its rear end so that it could give me kick,there's gratitude for you ! bloody thig cost me a fortune. it was strange how things were seasonal, i lived next to a park where everyone was playing football, then by magic cricket stumps appeared and there was not a fooball in sight, i think that the rule of the thumb was that the cricket season started on the first of may and the football restarted in August, not too sure now when the whip and top season was, i thought that it was in January, memories of window breakers, peg legs and carrot tops which were boring, if you can think of any more let me know.

shirley

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #23 on: 23:28:20, 10/01/11 »
 :) rEMEMBERING WHIPS AND TOPS. DOES ANYONE ELSE REMEMBER THE HOURS WE SPENT WITH COLOURED CHALKS DRAWING PATTERNS ON THE TOPS AND TRYING TO SEE WHO HAD THE BEST DESIGN.

jazzaroo

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #24 on: 00:46:30, 11/01/11 »
when i came to Leicester on the train from B'ham recently it seemed really wierd that the granby halls was not there,i don't frequent leicester too often these days and even though i knew that it had been pulled down i still half expected some part of it still to be there, from the age of about ten i used to live at the skating rink and eventually took up speed skating the result of which i moved to Birmingham to pursue my passion after the Leicester club folded ,i raced for about 12 years but was never much good really although i did manage to win a few medals over the years but I made alot of friends particularly in London where most of the races were staged and they were good times. in the late sixties a crowd of us got together and hired the rink when it was out of season, this also gave me a chance to have a look at the other hall where they used to stage the boxing matches,if i remember correctly there was a disused swimming pool that had been covered over which i never knew was there.

Dennis Neal

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #25 on: 19:19:28, 11/01/11 »
Two other lingering memories:
Lamplighters, who used to walk the streets with long poles lighting the Gas lights at dusk then again at dawn to turn them off.
Accumulators, to operate the old wireless sets. Would last about a week then had to go to the shop to be recharged.
Dennis

Johned

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #26 on: 19:41:16, 11/01/11 »
Our local hardware shop used to hire us a wet battery for 6d per week. Fair enough but it was pretty much of a crisis when the high tension battery went on the blink, it cost about fifteen bob to replace in 1946 and then there was the grid bias battery about 3/6d. Although we were in a rented property,my dad decided to use his army gratuity to have the house wired for electricity.  The day the contractor finished the job, I remember Dad coming home carrying a new super duper HMV radio complete with short waveband costing about 27. I used to try and tune in mysterious overseas stations on the shortwave and it had to happen,
by coincidence the set blew up whilst I was fiddling one Saturday night and I got the blame.  Dad had to fork out for a few new valves; the guarantee was'nt a lot of cop in those days!  A great radio and my brother still maintains it in working order!  British and best!

jazzaroo

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #27 on: 20:43:59, 11/01/11 »
we had a massive radiogram called a Raymond complete with auto record changer and two huge juke box type speakers ,somehow someone shut the lid down trapping a cat inside in its panic to try and get out it scratched all the grained wood inside, we never knew how it got in but it was a bit of a shock when my dad lifted the lid and a cat jumped out, there were some interesting programmes on the short wave radio but we always finished up with either Minsk or Oslo, in the late fifties when the transistor radios came out, i used to borrow my dads morris eight and hang the radio from one of the rear windows in an effort to tune into good old radio luxenburgh or even luxenberg (there probably both spelt wrong but no matter) reception was awful but the signal always seemed to be at its strongest when there was a crap record playing, we would keep turning left or right in an effort to chase the signal and finished up miles away and we were still non the wiser what the number one record was which was very important to us in those days, I'm sure they faded out the good records on purpose.

shirley

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #28 on: 23:25:52, 11/01/11 »
 :)
 
 
 
I misss not being able to buy cockles ans whelks offf the city market stalls.     They used to come in a little pot dish, help yourselves to condiments and were absolutely delicious.   They used to be a now and again treat when mum took me into town.  They had seveeral other sorts of stuff but i can'nt remember what they were, some sort of sea food i presume

jazzaroo

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #29 on: 01:43:03, 12/01/11 »
I miss not being able to flatten coins on the railway line, we had a very shortsighted shopkeeper on the southfields drive on the saff, and we used to pass off flattened sixpences for shilling pieces , a shilling was my pocket money for the week in those days so the extra money was useful this went on for quite some and eventually the police were called in and put a stop to it,they probably told him how to identify the coins by checking the milled edge that was on the shilling pieces. I feel pretty rotten about it now but shopkeepers  were making loads of money whilst most of the male population were fighting for their country, so yes, i can sleep at night, at least i didn't blow frogs up with a straw which seemed be a popular pastime  amongst the more sadistic types, suppose that was ok so long as didn't suck to draw breath,anyone want to admit blowing up frogs? i know that you are out there somewhere,anyway enjoy your next meal, bon appetite.

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