Author Topic: Things you dont see anymore  (Read 20912 times)

jazzaroo

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #30 on: 14:40:22, 12/01/11 »
 something that you don't see anymore is white dog [censored], story has it that when it was dried out and groiund into powder it made good snuff, it must have been good because after a couple of pinches of it you could smell dogshit really strong  !!!
what goes from red to green amber and back to red ........ if your thinking traffic lights forget it, the answer is a frog in a liquidiser, just trying to keep the frog theme going, got any frog stories that you can share with me . i do have some more  but they are too  rude and I'd hate to lower the tone.

Johned

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #31 on: 19:41:24, 12/01/11 »
Nofrogs I'm afraid but I do have a colony of toads in my garden shed.  If I dare to enter, they stand their ground and are quite aggressive as if to say "who the heck are you?"
My second cousin in Toronto is in a worse predicament though, she has a family of Raccoons in her garden shed and is unable to have them removed because they are a government protected species.  Having now learned of the practice from Jazaroo, I could, I suppose threaten the toads with being inflated with a straw and explode them - now there's a thought!

jazzaroo

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #32 on: 20:37:43, 12/01/11 »
hyah again, i never saw a frog explode but i assume that they must have done as its not something that I really wanted to see, I hated the whole practice but they used to blow up really big, the sadist also used to put animals and birds on the line ,it was horrible, there were some cruel people about in the good old days,  I thought that all toads said what the heck or something similar, i asked a toad once if he had read the works of william shakespeare to which he replied,   read it,read it       time for me to go i think after that, seeya

Pandora

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #33 on: 16:37:00, 13/01/11 »
How about the swimming baths in Aylestone? does anyone have a photograph?? My gt grandfather's company built them, and I'd love to see what they looked like.

Pandora

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #34 on: 16:39:33, 13/01/11 »
also tram lines on Narborough Road.  Cyclists used to get their wheels cought in them!!
And do you remember how the back of the seats in trams swung back or forward depending on which direction it was travelling??

Dennis Neal

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #35 on: 19:04:07, 13/01/11 »
Yes, I remember the swinging seat backs on trams. The real menace of the tram tracks came at the Clock Tower, as I know to my cost.
 
The tram conductor used to jump down and using a long pole stored on the side of the tram would swing the connecting pole to a different set of overhead wires to negotiate the roundabout or change tracks. Fascinating sight for little kids.
 
There was also the policeman controlling all traffic whilst standing on a pedestal opposite Burtons Corner. A monster task, but he orchestrated the flow beautifully.
Dennis

shirley

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #36 on: 22:30:58, 13/01/11 »
 :)
 
 
Oh yes i remember all those things above. its great when some one else jogs your memory
 a
nd you suddenlyremember things that you had temporarily mislaid!
The worst place for me to get stuck on my bike was the tram lines where saffron lane meets aylestone road
and i had to turn left.


jazzaroo

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #37 on: 03:00:32, 14/01/11 »
anyone remember during the suez crisis in 1957,learner drivers were allowed to go out solo
I never knew why this was but i was happy to go out on my own as an L plate driver, driving around the clock tower was the holy grail for learners ,Dennis neal mentioned the bobby directing the traffic in his white gloves , i came very close to knocking him off his pedastal once as he used make me nervous
if anyone knows the reason why L drivers could go out unaccompanied i would be interested to know as although i benititted from it ,it made little sense to me.

Dennis Neal

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #38 on: 10:15:32, 14/01/11 »
Never heard of unaccompanied L drivers. Sounds decidedly dodgy to me.
 
Took my test in 1946/7 in a crappy old Bradford Jowett van. Passed first time. Three weeks later I overtook a police car in my hurry to get petrol before closing time. Was fined 1 (a lot of dosh then) for exceeding 30mph in a goods vehicle. I must have been driving like a lunatic as I cannot immagine it going at more than 35 downhill!!!!!!!!!!
Dennis

jazzaroo

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #39 on: 12:29:34, 14/01/11 »
Hi Dennis, yes I remember the bradford van with its round windows in the back doors,one of my first jobs as an apprentice mechanic was to fit a clutch without suervision and I'll always remember that. I took my test in a 1935 morris eight ,failed twice, passed the third time with the help of tranquilers, to this day it was one of the most harrowing experiences of my life, In those days the rule of the thumb was that if you drove ok they would not bother too much with highway code questions, would not fancy taking todays test as i believe that it  is more about theory than actually driving  which is probably why we have academics on the road that can't really drive
I purchased a 1936 morris eight a few years ago and its in really good condition I hire it out for weddings etc, great lttle car but when i tell people that we used to travel to grt yarmouth   carrying four people and luggage they find it hard to believe, I think it used take us about six hours to get there, real motoring that,no screen washers or heater, 6 volt headlamps that were less powerful than your average sidelamps on the modern car,all this at a time where the cats eyes were few and far between, and then of course there were those pea soup fogs that thankfully seemed to have dissapeared now.

Dennis Neal

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #40 on: 14:55:02, 14/01/11 »
Used to drive a morris van which was even older than me and had a hand operated wiper along with advance and retard controls.
Gave up driving 8 years ago. Don't see too well.
Dennis

Johned

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #41 on: 15:14:54, 14/01/11 »
My first car was a 1932 Morris Family 8 h.p. which was two years older than me.  It had a manual ignition advance and retard and a crash gearbox.  The engine was an overhead cam, the same as used in early MGs, a fact I used to boast about to my friends when they criticised my pride and joy!  It was only really suitable for cruising around pretty flat country and if out with my old dad, many a time on a hill he had to jump out and put his shoulder to the back and give the old girl a supporting push!  It cost me 28 and my fiancee at the time (now my missus of 53 years) was not too pleased at my filching our joint savings to buy that particular example of the auto manufacturers expertise. Anyway, one day there was an ominous rumble from the bearings but I managed to trade her in (the car naturally) for a 1935 Austin Ruby 7 h.p. which was 45 for the same amount I bought her for.  The only reminiscence I can recall with the latter car is when, one day we were motoring through Houghton on the Hill and we encountered a lady trying to change the wheel on a Rolls Royce.  There was a regal grande dame reclining in the back of the car so expectant of a handsome tip, I pulled up and offered my services.  To my chagrin, having done my bit, the lady driver profusely thanked me and drove swiftly off leaving me to clean my filthy hands and clothes as best I could.  No gratuity.  There again to compensate, many good folk have helped me with my motoring problems down the years since.

jazzaroo

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #42 on: 15:32:28, 14/01/11 »
 interesting, my dad paid 90 for his morris 8 in 1954, very few people had cars on our estate ,dad could not really afford a car but my mother was dying of cancer at the time and she always dreamed of having a family car, sadly she died without ever seeing it but we hung on to it and used it for many family holidays, i bought the car off dad when he upgrated to a ford popular and i paid 45 for it, i was typical of my generation and the car was wrecked after about a year , i treat the morris that i have now with utmost respect and only use it sparingly.
i do remember the OHC engine that was akin to both the morris and Mg cars,my mate had a 1934 mg t series and  i remember that most of the parts especially the hydrualic brakes were interchangeable with the Morris eight.

Dennis Neal

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #43 on: 18:57:12, 14/01/11 »
I mostly drove company vans and cars and rode a bike until about 1962 when I had a promotion and took over the Bournemouth branch of my firm. This meant moving from Godalming in Surrey where we had been for 6 years and we eventually found somewhere we could just afford (only just) in Wimborne and have been here since.
Decided to buy our own car and teach my wife to drive. Bought a Standard Family 8, a tiny four seater for my 6'3" frame. Taught her to drive and she took her test only to break down - the butterfly on the carb broke and it kept stalling. The tester said "Sorry but I have to fail you and should abandon you but we can try and get back to the test centre". When they eventually returned he wrote out a pass chit and she has been driving ever since. Just as well, as I am no longer able to drive.
Dennis

jazzaroo

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Re: Things you dont see anymore
« Reply #44 on: 19:31:28, 14/01/11 »
Hi Dennis, its sad you are having trouble seeing properly but the positive side is that you no longer have to put up with the apalling antics with the present idiots that are out there on the road, if i was to respond to every waving loud mouth maniac that wants to insult me then i would probably be having a punch up every time i go out. the road planners haven't helped with the ludicrous road markings that are very misleading particularly at islands and road junctions and one is often forced to cut somebody up in order to retrieve the lane that has suddenly dissapeared, I'm no shrinking violet on the raod and i am still a long way from the cloth cap morris minor drivers that still think that they are still driving in the fifties nand i give as much as i gedt,but who needs it. I won't be driving much longer as i might be touring the canal networks if only to do something different.
I well remember the standard eights as i used to work on them in the fifties and i thought that they were one of the better baby cars as they were called at the time well before the minis came out.  i worked at a garage in walnut street opposite the football ground and many of the city players of the day were regular visitors but the one that i remember most was Gordon banks who had a standard eight circa about 1956 i think, great guy as well although he would probably not own up to ever owning such an uncool car for a footballer.

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