Author Topic: Glenfield hospital chapel  (Read 2976 times)

chapelman

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Glenfield hospital chapel
« on: 19:47:44, 01/08/09 »
Hello,

I am trying to find out some information about the old Glenfield hospital chapel, it features the name Berecah but I am unsure of its relivence. I am struggling to find any real information on the web, and am trying to find out when it was constructed and how long it was in use etc. A possible source of any photographs would be the ideal outcome. But any information would be wonderful none the less.

Kind Regards,

Jeff Rogerson.

janeb

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Re: Glenfield hospital chapel
« Reply #1 on: 22:21:54, 29/06/10 »
I don't have any information about the chapel but Berucah means 'blessing' or 'valley of blessings' - from the Old Testament

flyer

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Re: Glenfield hospital chapel
« Reply #2 on: 13:27:10, 30/06/10 »
Not 100% sure but i think this was put on the survey maps in 53 (i was chain man) so ref should be on there

alison rhodes

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Re: Glenfield hospital chapel
« Reply #3 on: 18:11:52, 30/08/10 »
I worked at glenfrith for many years, the chapel was used up to ten years ago.

King

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Re: Glenfield hospital chapel
« Reply #4 on: 12:35:51, 19/01/11 »
Hi We converted the chapel in 2001 and Named it Berecah, yes from the beautiful story of 2 Chronicles 20.  The word means valley of praise/blessings.  We live in Australia now, so don't have immediate access to property details, but it is recorded as a national monument by English Heritage, who hold an account of the history if you are still interested.

philip99a

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Re: Glenfield hospital chapel
« Reply #5 on: 18:42:06, 19/01/11 »
The organist (Ian Imlay) at the church that I attend (St Nicholas, which is next to the Jewry Wall in the centre of Leicester) remembers playing the organ there when Berecah was the hospital chapel.


I think that the long "verandah" like gallery along the south side of the former chapel was originally open to the elements and was where chest patients were put out in their beds for sun and fresh air (under cover). There are big curved balconies visible on the end of one of the older ward blocks at the Leicester Royal Infirmary which were for the same purpose. A medic may correct me but antibiotics have seen the end of such features and even seen the end of so many specific "Chest Hospitals". Groby Road Hospital was at one time a specific TB Isolation Hospital; out of the centre of town, plus ominously and conveniently close to Gilroes Cemetery.

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