Author Topic: Palace Theatre  (Read 11537 times)

jazzaroo

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Re: Palace Theatre
« Reply #15 on: 03:22:23, 14/01/11 »
I remember one of the cinemas had a theatre organ that came up out of the floor in front of the big screen, the words to the songs came up on the screen accompanied by a bouncing ball so that the audience  could follow and sing the words, i suppose that it could be described as early karioke (heaven forbid) but it made for a tremendous atmosphere , I'm pretty sure that it was the Savoy in belgrave gate, can anyone confirm this and was there another cinema, possibly the Gaumont that also housed a theatre organ?

Dennis Neal

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Re: Palace Theatre
« Reply #16 on: 09:42:49, 14/01/11 »
Yes, it was the Savoy that had the organ and it was played in the intermission.
Dennis

Johned

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Re: Palace Theatre
« Reply #17 on: 12:45:23, 14/01/11 »
Seem to remember reading in the Leicester "Mercury" that when the Savoy closed, there were still ladies working in their late middle age who had started there as young girl usherettes when the cinema first opened.  I reckon it was one of the best, if not the best cinema in the Midlands. 

jazzaroo

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Re: Palace Theatre
« Reply #18 on: 13:19:57, 14/01/11 »
 Johned, yep, I think that you are right about that, I seem to remember the Odeon as being ok as well
 at the other end of the scale was the Floral hall which was known as 'the flea pit' my dad used to say ,walk in and ride out and advised me not to go there as there were some very strange poeple that used to frequent it, in later years it dawned on me that perhaps he was worried in case i bumped into him?   sorry dad.

shirley

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Re: Palace Theatre
« Reply #19 on: 23:52:28, 14/01/11 »
 ;)
 
I remeber when the Cameo cinema opened. I was inted to show just the newsreels and cartoons.   Spent hours watching cartoons there, it was very popular with mumsm and kids in the daytime especially.        Later whrn the films were notm so popular it was used as a roller skating rink.    It was very small and you were continually turning corners.    It had a small shop which opened onto the side of the rink where you could but small eatables and drinks which was great as it was very difficult to get on and off the rink because it was so small. Anyone else go there to skate.

Dennis Neal

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Re: Palace Theatre
« Reply #20 on: 09:36:31, 15/01/11 »
I have some vague memories of the place but not sure if it is the right one.
Do remember skating at the Granby Halls though.
Dennis

shirley

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Re: Palace Theatre
« Reply #21 on: 17:49:08, 15/01/11 »
 ;)
 
Granby Halls. it was used for roller skating for quite a few years. Used it a lot and it was very popular.  Great times were had and it has a lot of good memories for me personally.   It was where i met my husband. He got his mate to knock me over in mugs alley so that he could help me up onto my feet(skates) then he took me into the cafe and spilled hot tea all down my brand new skating dress;  Don'nt know quite how but we ended up being married for 52 yrs. until he died 4 years ago.  The old place must have had something special


jazzaroo

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Re: Palace Theatre
« Reply #22 on: 18:02:15, 15/01/11 »
Don't set me off about the Granby halls as it was my second home for about Ten years, I'm the one that crashed headfirst through the back of the sweet shop that was situated at the end of he rink,during the madhouse that was the gentlemen only session,thankfully it was ony hardboard and no one was injured but it did give the lady in the shop a fright. mars bars can be quite painful when they hit you on the head !!

jazzaroo

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Re: Palace Theatre
« Reply #23 on: 13:56:02, 08/02/11 »
Does anyone remember tearing the corner of the cinema adverts on the buses to gain free admissioin to the cinema?  my local fleapit was the Aylestone situated on the corner of Grace road anbd Milligan road, I only ever used the corners at the Aylestone but I'm not sure whether or not they could be used at other cinemas  or not , I would suppose that it depended if the advert was for that particular cinema but I'm not sure !!
we had a neighbour on the saff that used to work at the Aylestone cinema and we used to get free corners from her usually if there was a cowboy film on, Roy Rogers, Gene Autry etc and it was very useful as it used to save me ninepence which was very nearly a shilling which was my pocket money for the whole week ,old money of course.

Johned

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Re: Palace Theatre
« Reply #24 on: 21:04:22, 09/02/11 »
I can't recall the reason now but I was given a complimentary ticket for admission to the Evington Cinema to see Arthur Askey, Glen Melvyn, Shirley Eaton and William Franklyn in "The Love Match" way back in 1955.  Arthur and Glen portrayed a goods loco crew and their daft antics thereto. The cinema is still in situ but was rebuilt into a Tescos. What a life of debauchery I lived in those days,me and my girl at the cinema five nights a week, theatre one night, with seat prices at two bob max I could'nt afford to live like that with today's fancy prices!  You certainly got your money's worth - if you were lucky you had the main feature, a second feature, March of Time, Pathe Pictorial, travel film (boring), Movietone News and a cartoon.  And today, just the main feature at a fancy inflated price.  My mother went into labour with me on her way to the Cinema (naturally she missed the film) so perhaps that is what engendered my lifelong fixation with that particular art form!

jazzaroo

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Re: Palace Theatre
« Reply #25 on: 21:54:21, 09/02/11 »
Johned, strangely enough the Love match was on tv only recently and i cringed when i watched it as it seemed so funny all of those years ago, it was good to see the old steam locos as the railway line ran along the back of the pitch where the Manchester derby match was taking place at Maine road i believe, another flick that i saw at the picture house in the late fifties was operation petticoat with Cary Grant and Tony Curtis, we went with our respective girl friends and again it seemed hilarious, that is until it found its way on tv fairly recently and i thought it was bloody awful, I used to think that Norman wisdom was funny when i was about 13  how sad is that.

Johned

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Re: Palace Theatre
« Reply #26 on: 14:46:57, 10/02/11 »
I first saw Norman Wisdom in an ice show at Harringay about 1952, he was an accomplished skater, let's just say he was big in Albania. Always a fan of Big Hearted Arthur Askey and his "Bee Song" I watched him in "The Ghost Train" last night on YouTube.  The film was made in 1941 and I recall queuing at our local to see it back then, only to be confronted by the manager apologizing as the film had not turned up.  Tastes change down the years and having now seen it, I'm glad I saved my sixpence admission at the time, I found it pretty dire!  I remember just prior to the war the family always listened to him and Stinker Murdoch in "Band Wagon" on the radio on Saturday nights and I later saw him in a West End revue "See how they run" in the mid fifties. I've seen Operation Petticoat and could never really accept Cary Grant in drag. I used to feel that following the example of David Niven and one or two other expats, he should have come back here during the war and done his bit but he did'nt.  Recently however, I read that no-one, despite all the studio hype, knew a great deal about him and what he knew he kept to himself and it was a strong rumour that he worked for British Intelligence.  Purely as a useless aside and not relevant to this thread, my late dad served briefly during the war as an NCO in the same unit as David Niven and he always used to say the gentleman you see portrayed on the screen is the same as in reality - a rare compliment from my dad when referring to an officer.

jazzaroo

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Re: Palace Theatre
« Reply #27 on: 15:27:56, 10/02/11 »
johned, I remember Richard Stinker Murdoch along with Sam Costa and Maurice Denham in much binding in the marsh if you remember that, I met Maurice Denham at actress Jane Lapatoires birthday bash at Stratford about  ten years ago,  Maurice passed on fairly recently and seemed a nice chap.
after the shock of hearing that Rock Hudson was queer( not gay) it would not have surprised me that cary grant might have been his friend as i always thought that there was something odd about him.

Johned

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Re: Palace Theatre
« Reply #28 on: 16:07:56, 11/02/11 »
Saw Maurice Denham playing a French general in the Frederick Forsyth film dramatisation "The Day of the Jackal" the other evening on TV; always a very versatile character actor and sadly missed.  Cary Grant I read lived for a time with Randolph Scott the Western Star who was reputedly and perhaps surprisingly one of the wealthiest celebrities in Holywood.  Evidently in private life he was a qualified accountant so was always a shrewd stock market player and investor and advised other celebs accordingly.   :o   

jazzaroo

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Re: Palace Theatre
« Reply #29 on: 20:38:26, 11/02/11 »
Johned, interesting to hear about Randolph Scott's financial enterprises, he along with Joel Mcree were suspected of batting for the other side if you know what i mean,what next? please don't tell me that Yul Brenner and clint eastwood were lovers as that would just about put the tin hat on it although nothing would surprise me the way things have gone,
I've remembered why i was suspicious of Gary Grant, he was interviewed many years ago when he admitted to wearing womens underwear claiming that they were more comfortable than  Y fronts, apparently he wanted people to know this just in case he was involved in a car accident or something, he's got a point , I can't wait to get home now and tear off the wifes panties as they are starting to make me sore,  ugh   

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